Sort of, anyway. They don’t touch the malware side of the issue at all. I got this in my inbox just now as part of their “Software Publisher Newsletter,” written by their Vice President & General Manager, Sean Murphy:

We are on the verge of fulfilling our vision of coming to market with an installer model that delivers files faster and more efficiently to users, while enabling developers to a) opt-in to the Installer, b) influence the offers tied to their files, c) gain reporting insight into the download funnel, and d) share in the revenue generated by the installer.

The ability to opt-in is not a feature request. It’s a Day 1 feature requirement. Download.com has been making money on other people’s software by barfing malware all over their customer’s systems (and by “their” I’m referring to the software authors).

Consider the Customer Experience Improvement Program (CEIP) that Microsoft has as part of Windows, Office, and numerous other software they release. It gathers information about how you use the software (e.g. which features you used, which buttons you clicked), and reports it to Microsoft. This clearly has enormous privacy implications. But, you have to opt-in to use it. The software asks clearly and politely if you’ll let them do this. The data is recorded in an anonymous manner. Things like permission and anonymity are not “features.” They are requirements.

Oh, and Microsoft actually uses that data to improve the software they release. Bazinga.

He continues:

First, on the press that surfaced yesterday: a developer expressed anger and frustration about our current model and how his file was being bundled. This was a mistake on our part and we apologize to the developer and user communities for the unrest it caused. As a rule, we do not bundle open source software and in addition to taking this developers file out of the installer flow, we have gone in and re-checked all open source files in our catalog.

Ok, whatever Sean. Nobody believes you. You’re not sorry about what you did, you’re sorry that people noticed and cared. You care that the bad press crossed a quantitative threshold, and that it just might affect your quarterly profit reports.

I wanted to verify that they had indeed fixed their catalog of open source software. VLC Player is, in fact, not being packed with their download wrapper (earlier blogs reported it was being bundled). Same goes for GIMP, GIMP Portable, and GTK+ 2 Runtime Environment (which are the first 3 hits if you search for “GIMP”). So from this tiny sample size of 4, it seems he is at least telling the truth for once. (I’d provide links to their pages on download.com, but I’d really rather not contribute to their page rank in any way.)

You can read the whole thing, if you’re really bored, over at their website.

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